South Africa’s Current Situation Is A Power Game

South Africa’s current situation in 2016 had been planned some fifty-two years ago by a think-tank, the “Bogenhagen Report” of 1964. The Bantustans/Homelands would become provinces in a country, governed by the African majority through a rural political party in the form of the African National Congress (ANC).

An urban political party by design could govern South Africa as from 2019. This too is reflected in that “Bogenhagen Report”.

Today in 2016 it seems that the struggle inside the ANC is among those, who want the old status quo of grand apartheid’s “National Party” back and those, who capitulate into a rural political party.

Considering the outcome of the last Local Government elections, the above-mentioned strategies could make sense. In other words, the Democratic Alliance (DA)-Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) would govern the Western Cape Province; Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape Province; Bloemfontein in the Free State Province; the capital Pretoria and the economic and financial hub, Johannesburg both, in the Gauteng Province.

Would the new urban political party be the DA-EFF and the rural political party the ANC?

In this process, the owners of the economy, also known as captains-of-industry and architects-of-apartheid with their hitmen and chequebooks in the shadows, seem to test the waters on how to overthrow the president. Foreign interests, who reduced the Ukraine to civil war and regime change, would not work in BRICS member, South Africa. This country has an elected head-of-state and commander-in-chief.

Brazil, also a BRICS member, had to deal with its coup d’état. Ousted president Dilma Rousseff faced a legally acceptable coup plot. The highly unpopular vice president, Michel Temer, replaced her. Temer has hardly any following and is viewed as corrupt.

Meanwhile, the same power mongers and their minions in their think tanks hawkishly observe the situation in South Africa developing. It would certainly not work to impeach president Jacob Zuma, as he and his ruling party, the ANC, retain the backing of the country’s majority. But, a collusion of many forces seems to work, similar to that used to topple president Dilma Rousseff and reduce the Ukraine to outright “civil war”. The forces seem to be the same.

The DA’s take-over of the Western Cape should be thoroughly studied. The former apartheid National Party, merely wearing a different coat this time around, consolidated the Western Cape, having done an analysis of the vulnerabilities of that province and then focused on them. The DA was indeed successful.

Not putting up an efficient and effective intelligence, the ANC has contributed to its major losses of Port Elizabeth, Pretoria (Tshwane) and Johannesburg in the last Local Government’s elections.

South Africa’s corporate mainstream media cartels bombard public opinion daily with Afropessimistic, anti-ANC horror stories. It is latently racist. In fact, their efforts could be described as “brainwashing of public opinion”. The old apartheid Strategic Communications (StratCom) media reports to deceive public opinion, seems alive and at work. The strategy of 70% fact and 30% fiction blended and emotively presented makes for effective media-propaganda. Eventually, the victims of the lie become its biggest protector.

In the up-coming preparations for the next party- and country president, the corporates and multi-nationals, their hitmen and their chequebooks collude to break the ANC up into polarized and tribal camps. They are working hard at securing their dispensation. Deputy president Cyril Ramaphosa is their man. Much money is thrown at their power-game. That could be the reason for Ramaphosa defending Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan.

Certain senior and experienced members of the ANC and its National Executive Committee (NEC) spoke to this writer under the condition of anonymity, expressed their concern and frustration, when they explained, “The ANC has bought into this new strategy. It’s not the movement we know anymore.”

The above-mentioned also pointed out, “In this power game senior members of the ruling party quietly worked with the opposition. They are all well known to the ANC. Their day will come when they’ll be named and shamed. They cannot be part of the ANC’s history.”

Daily media reports reflect countrywide student revolts and previously, also service delivery protests. President Jacob Zuma declared those unrests as democratic, as long as they are registered, legal and do not do damage to any property and, or persons. If however, property and, or persons are attacked and arson is committed, the culprits would be arrested.

If South Africa’s Police Services (SAPS) would allow student revolts and service delivery rebellions to get out of hand, the police would be viewed as staging a putsch against the state. If police services would be allowed to oversee revolts and rebellions, for that matter any form of anarchy, it would be self-destructive.

For the ANC to consolidate and protect itself against its enemies and to move forward, the movement would benefit from the following strategies.

  • The ANC needs to roll out a massive national debate to address all problems and obstacles. Branches, gatherings, meetings, conferences, newly re-established street committees, Afro-friendly media and other such platforms could be made available to address shortcomings and weaknesses.
  • A think tank could be established to work along the lines of a research institute or, a foundation. It would be tasked to do all research, work in a focused way with the movement throughout the country. That way, history could be put into perspective.
  • The ANC could further bring its newspapers such as SECHABA back to the national market, linking it to above network, progressive institutes, the BRICS structures, if and where possible.

In addition to above, it is important that the “blind trusts”, that are held by judges and politicians, will be outlawed and abolished as soon as possible. The electorate needs to know those “blind trusts”, as they seem a cesspool of corruption and power mongering through corporate influence. It is the cancer that could destroy the ANC. Parliament needs to pass laws to protect against such invasions; otherwise the chequebooks rule and the voters have no say. That is unfair and unsettling.

The rightwing, or neo-con economic strategies, such as the arms deal, the “Reconstruction and Development Programme”, also known as RDP under the late former president Nelson Mandela. The “Growth, Employment and Redistribution” (GEAR) programme followed. It was a macro-economic strategy under recalled, former president Thabo Mbeki.

None of them worked, least of all in favour for South Africans. Finally, they were done away with. The current programme, “National Development Plan” (NDP 2030) under the incumbent, Jacob Zuma, replaced the previous attempts. Will it work, given the history of the previous programmes? It does not seem like it. There are too many corporate interests with hidden agendas at play to control the ANC and its government.

South Africa’s flawed judiciary needs serious attention too. The biggest evil that grew from the CODESA negotiations in 1994 was the secret “Sunset Clauses”, protecting covert local and foreign structures. Those have greatly influenced the judiciary through a host of corporate cabalists, their lobbies, think tanks and societies and their joint secret trusts. If no changes will be undertaken, the unelected judiciary will keep pushing to take over power from government. It would be anti-democratic, undermining the nation.

Finally, the progressive forces need take charge for all to see and follow. How to take charge needs to be debated nationally as soon as possible. The ANC leadership needs to take the nation along, constantly informing and preparing it for any further efforts of destabilisation and sabotage.

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